UN Human Rights Council 15th session, September 23rd, 2010, Geneva, “INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND THE RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE IN DECISION-MAKING: Challenges and Advances within the UN System”, Panelists l to r: Andrea Carmen, Executive Director IITC, Claire Charters, Office of the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights, Mexican Ambassador Arturo Hernandez, Francisco Cali Tzay, member UN CERD member, hosted by IWA, AILA, FAIRA and IITC

UN Human Rights Council 15th session, September 23rd, 2010, Geneva, “INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND THE RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE IN DECISION-MAKING: Challenges and Advances within the UN System”, Panelists l to r: Andrea Carmen, Executive Director IITC, Claire Charters, Office of the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights, Mexican Ambassador Arturo Hernandez, Francisco Cali Tzay, member UN CERD member, hosted by IWA, AILA, FAIRA and IITC

The United Nations Human Rights Council was established in 2006 and is the core body focused on promoting and protecting human rights within the United Nation System. It is made up 47 member States (counties) and reports directly to the UN General Assembly. The 24th session of the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) will take place in Geneva from September 9th – 27th, 2013. The September session is where the reports of the UN Human Rights Mechanisms focusing on Indigenous Peoples (the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples) are usually presented. This year, those reports and a half-day interactive dialogue on the rights of Indigenous Peoples will take place on September 17th and 18th. IITC will also co-sponsor a side event on September 17th with Incomindios on “Human Rights Defenders and Access to Justice for Indigenous Peoples”.

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) Process is a peer review established within the work of Human Rights Council for UN member States to review each other’s compliance with their human rights obligations and make recommendations for improvements. All 193 UN member States are reviewed on a rotating basis approximately every 4 years. Reports and recommendations from other UN Human Rights processes addressing the country under review are compiled and submitted by the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights, and input from “civil society” and Indigenous Peoples are also considered in the review process.